Yagan Square Perth lunch date

Yagan Square in Perth, Western Australia, sits strategically between the city centre and Northbridge, connecting the two areas. As well, it links the Perth Railway Station and the Wellington Street Bus Station.

This new Perth attraction featured on my to-do-list for quite a while. Somehow, with the train-station almost on our door step and a three-kilometre journey, it seemed too close to make a special trip.

Eventually, I began to feel a silly admitting I hadn’t yet seen it. John and I made a lunch date. Dates, like holidays, should be fun at any age. Even simple lunches out, or holidays-at-home, which I wrote about in a post, ‘How to Holiday at Home’. We set off to enjoy our excursion.

A long time on the drawing board, Yagan Square can be thought of as a simple pedestrian walkway or as a meeting place and playground for everyone.

Where once a tangle of railway lines and rolling stock separated the city proper from Northbridge, there now exists a smooth transition with plenty of visual interest. I love the description from the official website, which says that the Square is ‘within the arms of the Horseshoe Bridge.

The photo below is of John, sitting on the side of the Bridge, which we have known and explored since we were kids in the 1940s.

John and I explored the precinct, built on two levels, in beautiful early winter sunshine. We lunched after much deliberation of many different cuisines in the food hall.

YAGAN SQUARE AND ABORIGINAL INFLUENCE

This newly developed area celebrates the Noongar people on whose country the development took place. Noongar representatives contributed from planning to completion of the project.

There is a strong Aboriginal narrative that runs through the square which incorporates stories from the Whadjuk people – the traditional owners of the land – exploring themes of place, people, animals, birds and landscape; all of which shape and create a strong sense of place. These stories have influenced various elements of Yagan Square, creating a unique space that is reflective of both culture and history. 

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NAMED TO COMMEMORATE YAGAN

The story of Yagan is both tragic and heroic. The early white settlers of Western Australia both feared and admired him. They saw in him a brave defender of his country. He was brutally murdered in 1833, four years after the settlement of the colony.

The murderers hacked off his head, which ended up in Liverpool Museum in the United Kingdom. A century and a half later, a delegation of Noongar people brought the head back to Perth. They buried it ceremoniously in the Swan Valley.

A nine-metre tall iron sculpture of the warrior Yagan dominates Yagan Square.

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10 thoughts on “Yagan Square Perth lunch date

  1. An interesting post, Maureen. I love how you are a tourist in your own hackyard.
    I enjoyed my brief visit to Yagan Square earlier on the week, and found the food hall rather good. I sat awhile and wrote at a table in the open.

    I plan on taking my husband there on a weekend, though that will have to wait on fine weather, now.

    • Thanks for your inspiration, Susan. I have watched you visiting, photographing and writing about all sorts of places recently. They seemed familiar, but looked different through your eyes.

      I hope your husband enjoys his visit to Yagan Square with you.

  2. It’s funny how sometimes we don’t explore the places closest to home. I’ve had the experience of overseas visitors staying with us telling me all about places in Brisbane I’ve never visited!
    Glad you had a good time.

    • Perth has changed and is changing so much all the time I feel as if I will never catch up now, Fiona. It is curious how we let things drift, don’t try new restaurants, visit different places. If I made new years resolutions, I’d put six new places on my list every year!

  3. Glad you found it interesting, Sue. It is a very inspiring place and we enjoyed ourselves. I’ve made a mental note to be more pro-active about seeking out new spaces and experiences.

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