The Yield by Tara June Winch, a review

The Yield by Wiradjuri author Tara June Winch earned its place on the Miles Franklin Longlist for 2020. The finalist will be announced on 16 July. The author’s first novel, Swallow the Air, won numerous literary awards. Last weekend, many Australians attended Black Lives Matter protests. I chose instead to immerse myself in this beautifully …

Exploded View by Carrie Tiffany – review

Exploded View by Carrie Tiffany will take its place at the forefront of both Australian and women’s literature. The winner of the inaugural Stella Prize, the author presents the reader with a dark, tightly controlled and poetic novel which has been long-listed for the 2020 Miles Franklin Literary Award.

A Fortunate Life – an amazing stage performance

A Fortunate Life, a theatre event unlike any I’ve ever experienced, thrilled and delighted my husband John and me. Guessing from the way the rest of the audience looked and sounded as we left the theatre, we were not alone. The show runs until 4 March in the Ace Cinemas, Midland. You can check the …

A Different Shade of Seeing by Elizabeth Brennan

A Different Shade of Seeing, a memoir by my friend, Elizabeth Brennan, delighted me. As Shane McCauley says: ‘We are privileged guests of the author as she shares her thoughts, observations and aspirations. History and folklore are discovered and retold through many incredible anecdotes.’

Books by Australian women – a challenge

Books by Australian women often fail to attract the reviews they deserve in the general and literary media. Not only that, they often do not appear on lists of best books forthcoming from publishing houses. The Australian Women Writers’ Challenge aims to make up some of the difference in numbers of reviews of women and …

This Place You Know, by Christina Houen – a review

This Place you Know, Christina Houen’s first book, tells of heartbreak, betrayal and, eventually, redemption. It explores some of the many facets of love in a poignant story, beautifully told. At the same time provides an important insight into Australian social history.

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